Preparing Today’s Youth for Tomorrow’s World of Work

‘A future of skilling strategy should look beyond the technical skills required for specific job profiles, and instead, seek to cultivate a set of core skills that can help chart meaningful and sustainable careers.’  

This – and more – was articulated and shared in an article originally published  by FVTRS on their souvenir for National Skill Conference 2019. 

To this end, it has outlined a 5-year strategy that explores the key channels of intervention to establish a global community of organizations and institutions to build the discourse for  self-learning for the 21st century and drive policy change. Such collaboration-driven learner-centric interventions also creates value for all stakeholders involved.

Thus, such an approachcan support government and private sector initiatives for building a robust school-to-work ecosystem, which will play an instrumental role in shaping the employability trajectory of the country.

Anytime, anywhere learning
Without the right educational and skilling programs,collaboration can only go so far. Over the years, Quest has learnt that technology-enabled blended learning solutions — an approach that is merged to its emphasis on 21st century skills and self-learning — can transform today’s classrooms by reducing dependency on formal learning spaces, creating opportunities for anytime, anywhere learning.

21st Century skills are intended to help students stay relevant in a changing job market.

A tool that is increasingly being used to complement traditional teaching methods, blended learning has been proven to increase student engagement — mainly due to more variation of activities during lessons — empowering them to become self-learners.

Quest has developed scalable models using blended learning technologies that can be replicated by its partners and network of educators. By working with middle schools, secondary schools, Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) and Vocational Training Institutes (VTIs) — with a special focus on adolescent girls — the organisation aims to create a nation of self-learners enabled by 21st century skills in preparation for the future of work and learning.

MyQuest: Getting young people job-ready

With as many as 4 million youngsters between the ages of 15 and 29 set to enter the workforce each year for the next two decades, India can make massive gains from its demographic dividend to transform its economy. Needless to say, it also demands urgent action to enable them with the right skills to make them more future-ready.

This is where MyQuest steps in.

A future of skilling strategy should look beyond the technical skills required for specific job profiles, and instead, seek to cultivate a set of core skills that can help chart meaningful and sustainable careers.

Anchored around 21st century skills and career development, the program has been designed to empower youth in a world that will demand constant learning, unlearning and relearning. Using innovative tools — including a comprehensive blended digital self-learning material — it enables students to develop market-oriented skills while building their confidence.

Additionally, MyQuest is directing efforts towards bringing women to the workforce. With the significant gender gap in digital access and literacy, women are bound to face greater challenges in coping with a fast-changing education and career landscape. In light of this, the program has been working to support the ITI ecosystem in India in order for them to bring in a gender-focus. Ambitious yet realistic, the program aspires to enable 9.5 lakh youth — including 40% women — in VTIs and skill building organizations to develop 21st century skills to become self-learners.

The underlying objective is to ensure that the program aligns itself with the goals of all involved, catalysing systemic changes across the skilling ecosystem — students become aware of pathways that runs parallel to their life and career goals; ITI Trainers and principals see themselves as change agents and become ambassadors for 21st century skills and self-learning approach and new partnerships – be it with government functionaries, industry players or NGOs – generate employment opportunities.

This article was originally published by FVTRS on their souvenir for National Skill Conference 2019. 

Aakash Sethi, CEO of Quest Alliance


Author: thelearnerbyquest

Quest Alliance's space for reflection on the education sector

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